Unhappy customer files lawsuit against timeshare resort

A consumer in the U.S has filed a lawsuit against Diamond Resorts and the Consumer reporting service Experian, after he attended a timeshare sales presentation. The complaint has been filed in Florida by a Charles Young, who alleges that after attending a Diamond Resorts presentation, for which he received a free gift, however declined purchasing on the day. Despite this Mr Young says the resort opened a credit account in his name and without his permission or knowledge.

Mr Young attended the presentation in 2017 but declined to purchase a timeshare but still left with his attendance gift. It was not until a year later when he was in the process of purchasing a home, that he asked Experian for a credit report and was shocked when he discovered an unauthorised account in the name of Diamond Resorts. He contacted Diamond and Experian to demand an explanation but neither companies were helpful. In fact, he spent an entire year writing to both parties asking for this unauthorised account to be removed from his credit history. Young was then forced to contact police as he was not getting any legitimate answers elsewhere. He has now instructed a lawyer to act on his behalf who say both Diamond and Experian are in violation of the Fair Credit Report Act, by failing to act when Mr Young contacted them to report the matter.

The case proves yet again that no one ever really leaves a timeshare presentation unscathed. Even though Mr Young declined to purchase, he has been left feeling the repercussions of simply attending a meeting and now must fight to have his credit history repaired due to this fraudulent activity.

People who enter into timeshare agreements often find it difficult to keep up with the mounting maintenance fees and simply cannot afford it any longer. They may also find that the timeshare no longer suits their needs and simply want to end the contract. There are too many individuals who are willing to take advantage of timeshare owners and offer fake products, along with timeshare exit schemes. Before agreeing to any timeshare termination or exit procedure with an individual or company, seek independent advice and fully research any company you are thinking of working with.

The mis-selling of holiday products is, unfortunately, common practice within the holiday industry and these types of crimes often go unreported by the most vulnerable in our society and criminal convictions are few and far between.

If you have purchased a Lifestyle / Concierge Service, a timeshare or a ‘holiday points’-based product from a resort or company and feel unhappy with the service, or feel you have been mis-sold this product, please get in touch with us to discuss how we may be able to help you with a possible Money Back Claim.

Dubai tourism board set new regulations to protect from timeshare mis-selling.

The timeshare model is not only popular in the US and Europe, but many other countries have adopted their own versions of holiday schemes and membership programmes, that unsurprisingly have left many owners unhappy and out of pocket.

Over in Dubai, where laws and regulations are strict, officials are acting to protect consumers against timeshare mis-selling and scams. They are hoping to put an end to fraud in the timeshare industry once and for all and protect residents. Dubai Tourism will develop new terms and conditions and technical standards that anyone selling or dealing in the timeshare industry will have to abide to before they can operate in the country. This means anyone dealing in timeshare will have to obtain legal permits and approvals before doing so. It also means that anyone wanting to sell timeshare or holiday products will have to be vetted beforehand which will hopefully weed out those individuals or organisations who do not act in the best interests of the public. The new regulations will also list and classify the residential units subject to the new law, Dubai tourism say that this new regulatory environment will stop any fraud in the timeshare industry.

In addition to this Dubai Tourism will also inspect timeshare facilities to ensure they are complying with the new laws. They will also oversee and be responsible for investigating complaints received against anyone or any organisation that works within the timeshare industry. According to the law, Dubai Tourism will establish and manage a database for all facilities operating as timeshare property in Dubai, create the contractual terms for time-sharing, and outline the requirements for timeshare advertisements. The hope is to weed out the bad players in the industry and these strict new laws and regulations will go a long way in doing so.

Timesharing in Dubai

Dubai is one of the fastest growing nations in the world and has become a vacation hotspot for people looking to experience a taste of the Middle East. You can find timeshare resorts in 121 countries and more than 5,400 resorts worldwide and it is estimated that there are around 7 million timeshare owners globally. So, Dubai has seen its fair share of timeshare resorts springing up in the holiday hotspot. The problem is that until now, the industry has not been subject to some of the strict laws and regulations the country in known for executing and some customers have been left out of pocket due to unscrupulous operators. There have been a handful of cases in the country where customers have signed up to timeshares and after either losing a job or experiencing a difficult financial situation the resorts have refused to give money back and relinquish contracts, something they had promised to do. So, the new laws will hopefully stamp out any bad practices and perhaps the industry will fair better if it works with the customers best interest in mind.

 

Timeshare Resale Scammer Sentenced.

A 34-year-old scammer from Florida, has been sentenced after he conned 50 timeshare owners, also from Florida out of thousands of dollars each. Brandon Welsh has been sentenced to 11 months in a federal prison for setting up and executing a re-sale scam where he promised timeshare owners, he could sell them quickly in exchange for a fee.

Welsh operated two companies, Premier Rental Solutions and Paramount Property Professionals which vastly exaggerated their ability to sell timeshares and claimed to have buyers ready to purchase. Two detectives from Florida’s Orlando Department, investigated Welsh and his activities for more than a year and discovered he had conned many elderly victims out of thousands of dollars. Welsh misled owners into thinking he could sell their timeshares quickly and all they had to do was pay a fee for marketing purposes, he then lied to victims telling them he had extensively marketed their timeshares. When victims complained, he promised to refund fees paid to his company, something he did not do. Welsh was sentenced to 11 months and ordered to pay $87,000 to his victims and was also found guilty of grand thefts of $20,000.

Timeshare resale scams

Unfortunately, timeshare resale scams are common, and they target people who already own timeshare and are desperate to get rid of them. The problem is many owners are under the illusion their timeshare is worth something in the first place. Something a timeshare resort will not tell you, is that a timeshare depreciates in value quicker than a brand-new car. What you will be told in a timeshare presentation is mostly far from the truth and people are led to believe they are investing in a timeshare which they can either sell on at a later date and make a profit on or that when they have finished using or no longer have use for it will be able to sell it and not make a loss on what they initially laid out to purchase it. These are simply untrue facts and are statements made by resorts to persuade people to purchase, the resorts know that if they told potential buyers the full truth about what they were purchasing, most people would not bother as they simply do not offer good value for money. The reality is they are a financial drain, due to the maintenance fees, and most owners end up regretting ever having owned one. This is not to say that there is no market whatsoever for timeshares resales, there is a fairly buoyant market in the U.S compared to the UK, where many owners find themselves listing their timeshares for pennies compared to what they initially paid out.

Timeshare resale scams are easy to spot.

In tough economic times, like we currently find ourselves in, offloading a timeshare and possibly making a profit is a tempting prospect. However, the sad fact is that most people will never see a return on a timeshare and anyone claiming to be able to get one is probably trying to scam you. Timeshare owners are often targeted by scammers due to their trusting nature and desperation to be free from the financial strain that comes with them, but do not be fooled and if an individual or company contacts you, look out for the following warning signs:

  1. Be wary of anyone making ‘too good to be true’ promises. A scammer may tell you your timeshare is a valuable location and worth money because of this, and they have buyers lined up. This is rarely the case and just a sales tactic to get you hooked in on their con.
  2. Never pay upfront fees. If an offer is legitimate, why would you have to pay someone for something you are selling? Or have to pay fees before a sale had gone through?
  3. Research any company fully before engaging with them. Ask them how they got your details and if they cannot provide you with a satisfactory answer, hang up, they are more than likely acting in bad faith.

Diamond Resorts are targeting millennials

Timeshares are always thought of as an older person’s purchase, but as millennials have overtaken baby boomers in the workforce, so has their spending power. Meaning the timeshare industry must look for new ways to attract the next generation of travellers.

If they fail to capture this market it could mean an end to the already dwindling timeshare industry. Diamond say millennials now make up their fastest growing membership demographic. Hard to believe when you consider the fact that timeshare has a horrible reputation and millennials spend much more time online then the elder generation and more likely to be aware of the pitfalls of ever entering into the world of vacation ownership.

The timeshare industry know that their survival relies on enticing millennials into their vision of endless vacations and spoilt for choice locations. But is the industry capable of living up to what it promises its customers. Well, with 85% of timeshare owners stating they are unhappy with their timeshares it seems unlikely unless the whole industry undergoes a complete facelift and stop pressure selling people into lengthy expensive contracts.

Diamond resorts say they are up for the challenge and are expanding their offerings with Destination Xchange program, whereby members have the ability to exchange ownership for a variety of different destinations and types of accommodation. They say millennials want choice, and they have the right recipe to satisfy a millennials appetite. They have also launched Diamond Live Concert Series, where members have access to a once-in-a-lifetime experience, like meet and greets with celebrities. Diamond believe that by revamping their points system members can customise their own experiences and get the most out of ownership. This sounds great; however, points systems are not always as easy to use as the resorts will have you believe. We here from many owners, daily, how they entered a points holiday program, only to find it hard to use, difficult to book, terrible availability and not what they were promised. Typically, when a person complains to the resort, they will be told they need to purchase more points in order to access greater opportunities, and so starts and endless cycle of upselling. So, before you are enticed into a sales presentation, do your homework, go armed with questions and never feel pressured into purchasing on the day. No-one should make an important financial decision on a whim, 9 times out of ten you will regret it.

Consider this before purchasing holiday points:

Before purchasing any points-based holiday product, do the math! Can the amount of points purchased provide you with the holiday you want each year, without having to purchase additional points you did not budget for?

Can you gain access to the types of locations and facilities you want to visit when you want to visit them? There are too many holiday club members who report being unhappy with the standard of accommodation using their annual points allowance. There are even reports of people being unable to book a specific week during peak season, despite having two years of accumulated points.

Research any company or organisation you are investing your hard-earned cash in. It is important to note that points owning members enjoying the highest levels of satisfaction generally have a good understanding of how to get the most out of their products.

New and exclusive developments are sure to attract many new customers seeking a unique holiday experience. However, many are persuaded to purchase ‘points-based’ holiday products, which are often non-refundable, non-transferable and with virtually no resale value. In addition to this, you will face mounting maintenance fees.

Timeshare owners ask court to reverse decision.

In 2016 a couple from the U.S. filed a lawsuit against Marriott Vacation Club, which bought into question the way in which the resort is marketing and selling timeshare in the State of Florida. The suit alleges that from 2010 unwilling customers were duped into purchasing MVC points that the resort claimed were deeded purchases. This meant owners believed, at the point of sale, they would own an interest in a property like that of timeshare ownership whereby a member owns a specific week each year in a chosen resort or property.

The lawyer arguing the case on behalf of the timeshare owners, stated that this violated Florida property laws as it tried to sell a points scheme by disguising it as real estate sales, when in fact there was no actual property interest involved. Lawyers for Marriott were able to successfully argue that the deeds at point of sale, identify a timeshare as a property interest, and under law timeshare is a legal real estate property. The judge ruled in favour of Marriott on this occasion, however the owners are not satisfied with this judgement and have asked for the case to be reconsidered, stating that under Florida law, MVC points to not represent physical deeded property ownership.

In making the ruling, the judge asked whether or not the owners had suffered any losses as MVC had not voided their deeds. However, the owners were forced to pay fees and take on financial burdens like maintenance fees, taxes and policy premiums which are normally associated with actual timeshare ownership but not receiving any of the benefits. Instead of having a dedicated week or two each year, MVC owners are allotted points, based on how much they spend, that are then used to book days at various resorts. This is often subject to additional costs and owners have complained they find it hard to book and availability is limited.

Ever thought of purchasing a holiday club membership?

Before purchasing any points-based holiday product, do the math first. Can the amount of points purchased provide you with the holiday you want each year, without having to purchase additional points you did not budget for?

Can you gain access to the types of locations and facilities you want to visit when you want to visit them? There are too many holiday club members who report being unhappy with the standard of accommodation using their annual points allowance. There are even reports of people being unable to book a specific week during peak season, despite having two years of accumulated points.

Research any company or organisation you are investing your hard-earned cash in. It is important to note that points owning members enjoying the highest levels of satisfaction generally have a good understanding of how to get the most out of their products.

New and exclusive developments are sure to attract many new customers seeking a unique holiday experience. However, many are persuaded to purchase ‘points-based’ holiday products, which are often non-refundable, non-transferable and with virtually no resale value. In addition to this, you will face mounting maintenance fees.

Two men jailed in nationwide timeshare scam.

Two men from the US have been sentenced to federal prison for their part in a timeshare scam that targeted and stole money from victims across the country. Ronald Carapellucci, 51, of Clearwater, was sentenced to six years in federal prison. Manuel Parrado, 47, of St. Petersburg, was sentenced to two years and six months in federal prison for their participation in a property-sale fraud scheme. Carapellucci and Parrado pleaded guilty in July.

The two men were charged with conspiring to take money from victims who were trying to sell their timeshares. Between 2015 and 2018, the two men, along with unnamed others, victimised timeshare owners from across the U.S. They told owners that they had buyers lined up to purchase their unwanted units. In reality, this was all a scam, and they would ask victims to pay fees in order to facilitate the sales.

The men further conned victims by claiming they needed payments for courier services, title searches, closing costs and transfer fees. Once a victim paid up the men would simply withdraw the money and disappear. In some cases, the men targeted these victims a second time, by claiming to represent another company who would be able to recoup the money they lost in the first scam.

What is a Timeshare Resale Scam?

A timeshare re-sale scam will usually start with a person being cold called by a company or ‘real estate agent’ claiming to be able to sell a timeshare for a fee. Fraudsters or criminal gangs pose as genuine real estate brokers and cold-call timeshare owners claiming to have buyers ready to purchase timeshares for inflated prices. Victims often report that they are offered sometimes up to 70% more than what they originally purchased it for.

The fraudster will ask the timeshare owner for an upfront payment of property taxes, and escrow fees before any funds can be released. The scammers continue to extract money from owners for fees, lawyer costs and taxes until finally the victim realises, they have been conned. Fake companies will pose as legitimate businesses using slick looking websites and fake reviews, to help fool victims.

How to spot a timeshare scam:

A cold call informing you they have a buyer ready to purchase your timeshare, they may even offer you more than you paid for it. The chances of someone offering to buy your timeshare for more than you paid for it, is extremely unlikely.

Do not be fooled by a professional looking website, the cost of creating these sites is very affordable and easily set up.

Stay Safe Online Check the web address is legitimate and has not been altered, you can check this by looking to see if there are any slight changes to a domain name.

Check paperwork you should check all your paperwork including receipts and invoices as well as terms and conditions.

What are the pros and cons of owning a timeshare?

If you are the sort of family or couple who enjoys taking a holiday at the same time and place every single year, year after year, then a timeshare might be right for you!

Similarly, if you do not enjoy planning your own holiday and you prefer to chose from a limited experience selection and be restricted in your choices, then a holiday club membership may suit your needs and lifestyle.

Whichever of these categories you fit into both come with an overwhelming amount of terms and conditions and fine print. And when we say fine print, we mean miniscule, it is literally hidden away in the dreaded legally binding contracts.

So, what exactly are the differences between timeshares and holiday clubs?

When you buy a timeshare, what you are actually purchasing is the shared right to a vacation property that allows you to stay there for a set amount of time, on set dates every year. The contract maybe indefinite or it may be set to expire after a certain number of years have passed and “you have had your money’s worth” (which is likely never the case). A timeshare can mean anything from a hotel room or apartment to a family sized villa or larger dwelling. You will normally always have to pay a one-off upfront fee for a timeshare, and this can be anywhere from £10,000 upwards. The only real flexibility with timeshares is where they are traded in or swapped with other timeshare companies or owners for different times and locations. However, the timeshare is set up, they are generally quite restrictive, this works well for some families if they must holiday during certain times of the year i.e. school holidays. But bear in mind many people find that when the kids have grown up and no longer want to go on holiday with their parents, you are still stuck with the same timeshare and it may no longer suit your needs.

With holiday clubs, or vacation memberships, the membership scheme requires you to prepay for your annual holiday. They do, however, allow for slightly more variation on the type of getaway you can plan, compared to a timeshare, but nether less are still incredibly restrictive when compared to planning your own package holiday. The system of points that members purchase is redeemed within a network of resorts. Most resorts offer these types of points-based holiday clubs and are moving away from the standard timeshare model, and there is one reason why! They are highly profitable for the resorts as they continue to trap people in lengthy contracts, upselling customers at every opportunity, slapping additional fees when customers try to book different resorts all while they continue to charge annual maintenance fees.

So are they really worth it? The best way to work out if this is a good investment or a financial drain is to calculate the cost compared to booking your own holidays. Over ten to twenty years (and holidaying in the same place) will you get your money’s worth? And do not forget to calculate the cost of maintenance fees, which will rise year in year out.

Holidays clubs do offer more flexibility to members, but that does not mean they come without restrictions. They all depend on the type of membership you buy, the higher the purchase price, the more options you have and a greater selection to choose from. However, compare this to booking your own holiday and not having to pay annual fees to do so, and they are rarely worth the money and trouble you will have trying to book through the complicated points system.

Officials warn timeshare scammers are targeting owners.

The Department of Consumer Protection (DCP) have issued a warning to timeshare owners after a surge of complaints from locals being scammed by people claiming to be able to buy and sell timeshares.

Resale scams are nothing new but local authorities in Connecticut U.S. are concerned after several people reported losing money to them. Timeshare resale scams are more common in the U.S as most contracts are in perpetuity, meaning they last the entire duration of your life and upon your death will be passed down to your loved ones. They are also deeded properties which means people own an interest in actual real estate and if they defer from making payments are subject to foreclosure and negative impact on their credit scores.

Timeshare ownership in the U.S works pretty much the same as everywhere else apart from a few subtle differences. Generally, in Europe timeshare provide for a stay in a fixed week, in a fixed room and at a fixed time of the year. The same is true in the U.S, except that timeshare are usually subject to a deed, meaning that the timeshare itself is registered. The laws differ from state to state; however they usually operate in the same way. The main difference from Europe is that contracts in perpetuity were deemed unlawful a few years back and timeshare resorts are no longer allowed to sell timeshares with everlasting contracts. U.S timeshare contracts are also harder to extricate the consumer from, as they are deeded which is not a simple contract, it means an owner owns an actual physical interest in a timeshare property.

Because of this U.S timeshare owners are more likely to fall for a re-sale scam, especially as they are also sold as investments because they are deeded. Many owners are still under the illusion that timeshare is an investment, and they can sell it on when they no longer want to use it, or, like many others, become fed-up with paying maintenance fees. This simply is not true; timeshares are a depreciating asset and a financial liability. They lose money the second you purchase and rarely will you see a return on any investment made in one. However, unlike Europe, there is a fairly buoyant re-sale market in the U.S and some legitimate companies that trade and sell timeshare, but it is hardly lucrative and many people end up listing their timeshares for years on end hoping for a sale that never comes. So, it is unsurprising that people hoping to make back some of the cash they spent are susceptible to anyone claiming they can sell their timeshare and possibly make a profit.

What is a Timeshare Resale Scam?

A timeshare re-sale scam will usually start with a person being cold called by a company or ‘real estate agent’ claiming to be able to sell a timeshare for a fee. Fraudsters or criminal gangs pose as genuine real estate brokers and cold-call timeshare owners claiming to have buyers ready to purchase timeshares for inflated prices. Victims often report that they are offered sometimes up to 70% more than what they originally purchased it for.

The fraudster will ask the timeshare owner for an upfront payment of property taxes, and escrow fees before any funds can be released. The scammers continue to extract money from owners for fees, lawyer costs and taxes until finally the victim realises, they have been conned. Fake companies will pose as legitimate businesses using slick looking websites and fake reviews, to help fool victims.

How to spot a timeshare scam:

A cold call informing you they have a buyer ready to purchase your timeshare, they may even offer you more than you paid for it. The chances of someone offering to buy your timeshare for more than you paid for it, is extremely unlikely.

Do not be fooled by a professional looking website, the cost of creating these sites is very affordable and easily set up.

Stay Safe Online Check the web address is legitimate and has not been altered, you can check this by looking to see if there are any slight changes to a domain name.

Check paperwork you should check all your paperwork including receipts and invoices as well as terms and conditions.

Two timeshare giants, two very different stories.

This week Timeshare giant Hilton Grand Vacations has announced they will be letting go of 1,600 employees after putting them on unpaid furlough for six months during the Coronavirus outbreak.

HGV placed the workers on furlough back in April when local lockdowns began and so far this year the company has reported losses of $123 million and unlike some of the other timeshare resorts has been refunding some guests which has cost them around $3 million. In the same period last year HGV reported profits of $39 million but this year revenue has fell by 73% due to cancellations and owners choosing to stay at home.

Mark Wang, president of HGV said in a statement: “Due to the prolonged impacts of Covid-19 and the uncertainty of the duration of the pandemic, we have made the extremely difficult decision to reduce the size of HGV’s workforce by approximately 1,600 of our team members. It is with a heavy heart that we are making this necessary business decision, which we believe will position us for the long-term success when the world, our industry and communities rebound from this challenging time.”

This news is in complete contrast to Wyndham destinations, who despite the pandemic, have reported gross sales totalling $168 million. Wyndham said the figures are from profits made during July and August and as a result of customers returning to their resorts. Incredibly they say the volume of guests rose by 30% in July and August which was an increase on last year. The figures are calculated by dividing vacation ownership sales by the number of people who attend sales presentations.

The timeshare company is expecting these figures to improve further as people are opting to vacation in ‘drive to locations’ to avoid local lockdowns but still be able to make the most out of their timeshare memberships. In a statement Chief executive Michael Brown said: “As we said in July we are continuing to see the green shoots of the recovery with continued steady growth in volume per guest as resort occupancy started to rebound while our owners began to enjoy their summer vacations. While many resorts in Hawaii and California have yet to reopen, we’re able to reaffirm key business metrics that demonstrate the resiliency of our business.”

The two announcements are worlds apart as one resort appears to be struggling and the other is seeing record increases. It comes after timeshare companies have been targeted in the press for so called ‘profiteering’ and taking advantage of their members during the pandemic. It seems that most of the big resorts have continued to charge their members maintenance fees, despite most owners not being able to use the facilities at all this year. Some of the resorts have been providing refunds for booking fees but so far it seems none are planning to refund maintenance fees, offer any discounts or indeed move reservations to another time. It has left owners furious and wondering if they would be better off getting out of their timeshare contracts altogether.

If you have purchased a Lifestyle / Concierge Service, a Timeshare or a ‘holiday points’ based product from a resort or company and feel unhappy with the service, or simply want to end your agreement, get in touch with us today to see how we can help with a possible money back claim.

Lawsuit filed against fraudulent timeshare exit company

The attorney general for Arkansas has described how a timeshare exit company operating in the U.S has been acting in a fraudulent manner to dishonestly take fees from timeshare owners who are desperate to end their contracts. The company is being sued under the Deceptive Trade Practices Act for charging exorbitant fees to clients but failing to deliver the services they promised.

The company named as Real Travel is being sued and if found guilty will be ordered to pay $50,000 in restitution and $450,000 in suspended civil penalties. The company has been highlighted in the U.S press a number of times now and the lawsuit, which was filed last year, alleges that clients have been complaining about the company’s failure to deliver despite taking huge fees for services upfront.

Real Travel sold timeshare exit services in exchange for fees which varied from $5,000 to $18,000, customers complained that they were lured to sales presentations which lasted hours on end and were subjected to high pressure sales tactics. At these presentations potential clients were promised a 100% guarantee that the company would liquidate, cancel, or transfer their unwanted timeshares. However, after an investigation into the company by the Attorney General’s Office, they discovered 83 customers had signed up to Real Travel services and paid fees to the company. The company had failed to carry out any of the services they had contracted to undertake and simply pocketed the money, the victims were still burdened with their timeshares and thousands of dollars out of pocket.

The Attorney General’s Office is urging anyone else who has been affected by this company to get in touch with them and make a complaint. If the judgment is successful Real Travel will be banned from conducting any business related to timeshare and exit services in the State of Arkansas.

At some point, many owners will regret ever hearing the word timeshare. Like many of the other 20 million timeshare owners, who have been lured to a sales presentation with the promise of free meals or gifts, find themselves leaving with much more than they bargained for. Newly signed up timeshare owners often leave feeling regretful after making a choice they did not intend to make or were persuaded to decide on something they weren’t ready for, committed to, or were intimidated into going along with. In fact, it probably would not surprise you to learn that a recent study carried out by the University of Central Florida, learned that a whopping 85% of those who buy timeshare, regret their decision.

The vast majority of timeshare owners claim they never would have made the purchase if they knew exactly what it entailed. However, getting out of a timeshare contract is nearly impossible as resorts are desperate to hang on to their members and the annual maintenance fees, they charge them. The reluctance of timeshare resorts to provide viable exit strategies to their clients, has made it easy for fraudulent companies and individuals to operate and take advantage of desperate owners.

People who enter into Timeshare agreements often find it difficult to keep up with the mounting maintenance fees and simply cannot afford it any longer. They may also find that the Timeshare no longer suits their needs and simply want to end the contract. There are too many individuals who are willing to take advantage of Timeshare owners and offer fake products, along with Timeshare exit schemes. Before agreeing to any Timeshare termination or exit procedure with an individual or company, seek independent advice and fully research any company you are thinking of working with.